How to Submit an Offer Below the Asking Price Without Spooking the Seller

Going Low: How to Submit an Offer Below the Asking Price Without Spooking the SellerYou’ve found it: A large new home for your family. It’s in the area of the city that you love, with the perfect architectural style and lots of room for entertaining guests. It would have been perfect for you, but there’s only one problem – you’re not quite ready to pay the price the seller is asking for. You’ll have to put in an offer below the seller’s asking price – a risky move.

Although you will be rolling the dice with an offer below asking price, there are ways that you can increase the likelihood that your offer will be successful. Before you submit your offer, use these three strategies to make it more appealing.

Work Out Other Terms In The Seller’s Favor

If you’re going to ask for a lower selling price, it helps to show that you’re willing to compromise on other terms – that way, you come across as a reasonable human being and not a bargain hunter. By offering to give the seller the better deal on other terms, you’re showing that you want to close a sale – and the seller will see you making an effort to come to an agreement and respond in kind.

There are several ways to do this. When you submit your offer, see if you can negotiate an arrangement that has you paying the closing costs or a closing date that works better for the seller. Or, offer to make the down payment in cash or give the seller a larger deposit.

Arm Yourself With Facts To Make Your Case

If the home you want to buy is priced well above fair market value, you can easily use that to your advantage and turn it into a benefit for the seller. First, you’ll want to look up property values for similar homes in the area. You should also investigate how long it takes homes in that area to sell and the difference between the average asking and average selling price in the area.

If you can show the seller that their asking price is above their neighborhood’s average sale price or that their home has been on the market longer than the average home (or both), then you can make a strong case for a lower offer.

Submitting an offer below asking price can work, but it’s not something that should simply be done on a whim. It takes careful planning and a great strategy to actually win a bid if you’re coming in below asking price. Contact you trusted real estate professional to learn more about how to submit a below-asking-price offer.

Selling Your Home? 3 Reasons Why You May Need to Accept a Bid That’s Below Your Asking Price

Selling Your Home? 3 Reasons Why You May Need to Accept a Bid That's Below Your Asking PriceWhen a homeowner makes the decision to sell his or her property, it is most common for a skilled real estate professional to provide valuation services so that a reasonable asking price can be established. While the asking price may seem fair to the homeowner, the fact is that not all properties will sell at the original asking price. There are several instances when a homeowner may need to consider accepting a bid that is below the asking price.

When The Property Has Been On The Market For A While

Most homeowners will learn about the average listing time for similar properties in the market through their trusted real estate agent, but some homes will remain on the market for longer than average. When this happens, a homeowner may begin to get concerned, and the real estate agent may even bring up the idea of reducing the asking price. When an offer is received below asking price in this situation, a homeowner may need to consider the offer.

When There Is A Question About Property Style Or Condition

There are many factors that will play a role in the desirability of a property in the marketplace, and some of these factors relate to the property style and condition. Some similar homes in the local area may be selling more quickly or for a higher price than others due to better overall condition or improved style. If the homeowner has concerns about this or if the real estate agent or others who have toured the property have voiced concerns about style or condition, accepting an offer below asking price may need to be considered.

When The Homeowner Needs To Sell Quickly

Even if property has not been listed on the market for a long period of time or the property style and condition are desirable, the owner may consider accepting the first offer received regardless of the asking price in some cases. For example, a homeowner may need to sell the property quickly due to financial issues, because of a job relocation or to take advantage of other financial opportunities. Unless the offer is unreasonable, the homeowner may consider accepting a lower bid in these situations.

Homeowners often wonder if they should wait for a higher bid or accept the offer that has been presented to them. Each situation is unique, so there is not a catch-all answer to this question. Those who are thinking about selling their home in the near future can contact their trusted real estate professional for further assistance.

Understanding Escalation Clauses and When You’ll Want to Automatically Raise Your Offer

Understanding Escalation Clauses and when You'll Want to Automatically Raise Your OfferReal estate sales contracts can be confusing, and there seem to be contingencies and special circumstances for many different events built into a standard contract. One option that your real estate agent may ask if you are interested in is an escalation clause. This is typically an optional clause that you can choose to invoke if you desire, so you should take time to learn more about what it is before you make your offer.

What Is an Escalation Clause?

It can take a considerable amount of effort and time on your part to locate the perfect home to purchase, and the last thing you may want to do is to lose the home that you have fallen in love with during a bidding war with another buyer. However, you also do not want to make an offer that is so high that it is not attractive or beneficial to you. Ideally, you want to get your dream home at the lowest price possible.

An escalation clause essentially permits you to make an offer, but it has a built in option for a higher offer that will go into effect if the seller receives an offer higher than what you have offered. Essentially, it serves as an immediate response to a second offer to protect you in the event you are involved in a bidding war.

How to Use an Escalation Clause

An escalation clause can be highly beneficial, but you do need to understand how to use it. First, your initial offer should be competitive enough so that the seller shows interest in it. Second, your escalation clause offer should serve as your maximum offer. This offer ideally will remain in the limits of the market value of the home. It also should still be affordable for you to purchase. If you are not comfortable making a higher offer or if your higher offer would price it out of market value range, you may consider not using the escalation clause.

The ability to automatically raise your offer with an escalation clause can be beneficial when this clause is used properly. You can speak with your agent more about the interest in the home by other buyers as well as the overall market conditions to determine if using an escalation clause would be beneficial for you when you are structuring an offer to present to a seller.

Received an Offer for Your Home? How to Respond with a Counter-offer Asking for a Higher Price

Received an Offer for Your Home? How to Respond with a Counter-offer Asking for a Higher PriceGetting an offer on your house is the first step in getting it sold, but buyers often feel that they have to come in lower than your asking price. After all, everyone wants the deal to work out in their favor. If the offer you received isn’t quite what you hoped, you can always make a counter-offer. Getting the details right can help make your deal go more smoothly.

Deciding On A Price

When your real estate agent helped you set the price of your home, you already had an idea of what it should fetch in the marketplace. If the offer wasn’t far off from your asking price, it’s acceptable to counter with your original asking price. Many buyers could be willing to pay full price. If you feel that technique is a bit brazen for your style, you could instead drop the original price by a few thousand dollars.

Another technique is to try to “meet in the middle”. For example, if there’s a $10,000 difference between the asking price and the offer price, you might offer to drop the price $5,000. Of course, the bigger the difference, the less enthusiastic you’ll be about dropping your price.

Factors To Consider

Keep in mind that the actual selling price of the house isn’t the only thing that will be negotiated. If you’re giving in a little bit, then you should expect to get a bit in return, but the same is true for the buyer. For example, a first-time homebuyer might not have a lot of money for a down payment. If you counter with an offer that’s too high, they might respond with another offer accepting the price, but asking for seller’s concessions at closing time.

Additionally, as you start to come down in price, you might consider taking out items that you might have included in the original offer, such as high-end appliances.

Don’t Forget The Fine Details

Discuss the details of what you want with your real estate agent. They’ll be able to let you know if you’re making the right move, considering the current market in your area. They may also have information about the buyers, such as an educated guess about how high they’re willing to go. Your agent will also have all the paperwork you need readily available. In most cases, all you have to do is fill in the blanks in a few spaces.

You want the highest price for your home, but getting the best deal is often a delicate dance. Know your limits and work together with the buyers to reach an agreement that is mutually beneficial.

Put Your Game Face On: How to Negotiate with a Home Seller and Their Real Estate Agent

Put Your Game Face On: How to Negotiate with a Home Seller and Their Real Estate AgentAll real estate transactions come with at least some negotiations, and some transactions are heavily negotiated from start to finish. As a home buyer, you understandably want to negotiate the best overall deal possible while successfully reaching your goal of closing on the home you have fallen in love with. To be truly successful with this process, it is important that you understand how to negotiate with the seller and the seller’s real estate agent.

Understand The Seller’s Position

In order to be successful with negotiations, you will need to understand the motivations and desires of the other party. A seller may have an emotional attachment to his or her home, but he or she also may have a desire or need to move. Some may have a firm bottom line for a price that they can accept or concessions that they are able to pay for out of pocket. While some may be unreasonable, most are willing to compromise and negotiate provided that your offer is feasible for their financial situation.

Define Your True Requirements

Just as a seller will have a hard and fast bottom line, you also may have specific requirements that you need to meet. This may be a firm closing date, the need to have some of your closing costs paid or a firm sales price that you do not want to exceed. While negotiations inevitably may have you asking for slightly more than what you truly need, it is important to define for yourself what your true requirements are and to remain focused on these when negotiating.

Be Willing To Compromise

When offers and counter-offers are flying back and forth between a buyer and seller, it is easy to feel stressed and even challenged by the other party. While there are times when a seller’s counter-offer may be unreasonable, most are reasonable and fair within limits. You may decide to submit a counter-offer as well, but some compromise will show the other party that you are willing to work with them.

From negotiating a sales price to asking the seller to make some repairs to the home after the inspection has been completed, there may be different times during the process when you need to negotiate. Consider these tips to help you more successfully negotiate with the seller and seller’s agent. A skilled real estate agent can also be instrumental with representing you during negotiations, and you can seek assistance from an agent today.

Mind Your Manners: Four Etiquette Tips That Will Help Make the Home Buying Process Go Smoothly

Mind Your Manners: Four Etiquette Tips That Will Help Make the Home Buying Process Go SmoothlyAre you currently shopping for a new home? While it’s true that real estate transactions can be stressful, this stress can be minimized by following a few simple tips. For example, following proper etiquette plays a big role in making your real estate experience go smoothly, and in this post we’ll share four key etiquette tips that are sure to help.

Get Preapproved

Prior to shopping, a buyer should check with a lender to determine the maximum loan amount they qualify for. This is proper etiquette because both the seller and the real estate broker have likely prepared themselves and assume you have as well.

Keep It Professional

Shopping for a home seems personal, but keeping interactions on a professional level can ease the awkwardness of the process. One step in that direction is being considerate of others’ schedules. Proper etiquette includes being realistic about how many properties can be seen in a span of time. Allowing time for a sellers’ special conditions, pets or children is also good etiquette.

Negotiate Through A Representative

When it’s time to negotiate pricing between a buyer and seller, the real estate agent should be used as the intermediary. While touring a property, it is best not to make offers or discuss how much the house is priced for, or make any counter offers without involving the real estate agent. It is also not advisable to point out stains, outdated designs or noticeable damage in the hopes of getting a discount.

Use Closing Credits

Home sellers should not be surprised once a buyer has decided to close and begins to negotiate the price. Home inspections reveal problems a home has and the buyer’s willingness to continue negotiating can depend on how willing the seller is to address those problems. A closing credit can be a win-win for both parties. If the buyer and seller of the home agree on closing credits instead of repairs and inspections, the buyer has the option of hiring a contractor and dealing directly with the contractor if not satisfied. Meanwhile, sellers are typically ready to move out or are not living at the property, so closing credits save them time.

Well-mannered people handle real estate transactions in a way that lets them join the ranks of successful buyers and sellers who operate with as little stress as possible. The good news is that real estate agents can help with understanding what proper home-buying etiquette is. Call a real estate agent to receive guidance on how to navigate a real estate transaction with ease.

Negotiation Tips: How to Ask the Seller to Pay the Closing Costs

Negotiation Tips: How to Ask the Seller to Pay the Closing CostsYou’ve found the perfect new house or condo, and you are now preparing an offer that you believe the seller will find tempting enough to accept. However, you know that there are going to be thousands of dollars in closing costs that need to be paid before the sale is completed and you become the home’s new owner.

The question is, should you ask the seller to pay some or all of the closing costs? In today’s blog post we’ll address this question and list a few scenarios in which you may want to consider having the seller pick up the tab.

Ask if You’re Offering the Full Listing Price

If you’re prepared to offer the full asking price for the home you can certainly include the caveat that the seller assist with some or all of the closing costs. Many sellers will price their home slightly higher than they expect to receive as they believe that buyers will submit low initial offers which need to be negotiated.

For example, if a home is listed at $275,000 a seller might actually be expecting $260,000 or $265,000 for it. You can offer $275,000 but ask that they take care of the closing costs.

Ask if You’re Confident the Seller Has Few Other Options

If the home has been on the market for a number of months or if you’re fairly confident that the seller isn’t going to find much luck elsewhere you can ask them to pick up the closing costs as one of your purchase conditions. You’ll obviously want to negotiate in good faith, but if you’re coming from a position of strength you can leverage this in to some additional savings.

Ask if You’re Ready to Close Immediately

Are you ready to sign on the dotted line today? If you’re sure that this is the right home for you, let the seller know that as long as they’re willing to assist with the closing costs and accept your bid that you’ll start the closing process today. Nearly all sellers will be willing to make a small sacrifice to get the deal done.

As you can see, there are a number of situations in which it makes sense to ask the seller to shoulder some of the closing costs. If you have found a home that you wish to purchase and you’d like advice on how to proceed, contact a real estate agent today. An experience real estate professional can help you craft an offer that the seller won’t be able to refuse.